How a Story Ought to Be–Truthful and not Grotesque

Photo Courtesy of Pixabay
Photo Courtesy of Pixabay

One of the most prolific examples of fiction theory comes from “The Fiction Writer & His Country,” by Flannery O’Connor, a prolific fiction writer from the 1960’s South. O’Connor explains the reason why most people are drawn to grotesque elements in literature: These people experience grotesqueness in their lives and thus struggle to relate to anything else. They do not enjoy happy endings because they do not experience happy endings. Above all, they do not realize Jesus’ hope, and as a result, their stories have elements that are also without hope.

However, fiction should not include grotesque elements for the sake of being grotesque; rather, fiction should leave readers with a sense of energy, excitement, or hope, while conveying truth in a manner that seems realistic or true to life.

In my fiction writing, I aspire to create this atmosphere and convey my Jesus without words that only Christians would understand or fantastical situations that non-Christians would disbelieve. (If my stories require the character’s demise, I will use it.) I want to gradually incorporate Him in my stories until my readers are accustomed to Him. If I offend them with Jesus, I will not mention Him. Yet if they are open to possibilities, I will show them what joy I have found in Him (such as no stress) and appeal to them through this enjoyable atmosphere.

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2 thoughts on “How a Story Ought to Be–Truthful and not Grotesque

  1. O’Connor once said something to the effect of, “I’m often asked whySouthern writers so often write about freaks. It’s because we can still recognize them.” Perhaps something similar could be said about thoughtful Christian writers. Not “freak” part so much, but He’s there because we can still recognize Him.

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